Prof. Nicky Clayton & Prof. Clive Wilkins of The Captured Thought will appear at the Oxford University Scientific Society this week to discuss the psychology of cognitive illusions and why the mind is tricked ~Thursday, 4th February 2021 from 18.30-19.30 UTC2

Taken from the website of the Oxford University Scientific Society …

This Thursday we will have two fantastic speakers: Professor Nicky Clayton FRS, Professor of Comparative Cognition in the Department of Psychology at the University of Cambridge, and Professor Clive Wilkins MMC, Artist-in-Residence of the same Department, and also a celebrated illusionist. Together, science and art, they will talk about cognitive illusions and how the mind gets tricked.

The Psychology of Cognitive Illusions

Their talk will explore what cognitive illusions reveal about the psychology of the human mind; not just perception but also memory and the ability to mentally travel in time, to revisit our past experiences and reflect upon them, and to explore places we have yet to visit and imagine what they will be like. Magic effects also illuminate some important things about Theory of Mind, our ability to think about what others might be thinking, both on the part of the audience and on the part of the magician. Both mental time travel and theory of mind are constrained by egocentric bias, our tendency to overvalue the present self over other selves and other times.

Professor Nicky Clayton FRS is the Professor of Comparative Cognition in the Department of Psychology at the University of Cambridge, UK. She is particularly interested in the processes of thinking with and without words, and comparisons between the cognitive abilities of corvids (members of the crow family) and children. She was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS) in 2010. She is also the Scientist-in-Residence at Rambert (formerly Ballet Rambert), since 2011.

Professor Clive Wilkins MMC is the Artist-in-Residence in the Department of Psychology at the University of Cambridge, UK, which is a position he has held since 2012. Clive is a fine art painter and writer, and was elected a Member of the Magician’s Circle (MMC) in 2018. Clive’s paintings have been frequently seen in London Mayfair art galleries. His written work has appeared in print on numerous occasions, most notably ‘The Creatures in the Night’, a story written and illustrated by Wilkins in 2008, and most recently ‘The Moustachio Quartet’.

This talk will live broadcast on:
– Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/OUSciSoc/
– Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChP1tLqksAmtm52JLDka8gA
– Twitter: https://twitter.com/OxfordSciSoc

Posted in CHINA UK DEVELOPMENT CENTRE, Clive Wilkins, Clive WILKINS AUTHOR, Clive Wilkins Magician, CUDC, Department of Psychology, Nicky Clayton, Prof. Clive Wilkins, Prof. Nicky Clayton, Prof. Nicola Clayton, Professor Clive Wilkins, Professor Nicky Clayton, The Captured Thought, The Lost Library of Miraculous Metaphors & other short stories, The Moustachio Quartet, The Royal Society, Uncategorized, University of Cambridge | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Cambridge academics presentation to Deans and Heads of Department at ZhengZhou University with Professor’s Clayton and Wilkins

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Centro Tlaxcala de Biologia de la Conducta, Unversidad Automoma de Tlaxcala, Mexico. Behaviour Symposium. Conflict: Current validity and relevance of the four Tinbergen questions The Development and Evolution of Cognitive Illusions

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

19th-22nd July 2021. Gutenberg International Conference Centre, Mainz, Germany. Biology of Dance: Social interactions. Symposium~ becoming social. Physical workshop

Posted in Nicky Clayton, Prof. Nicky Clayton, Prof. Nicola Clayton, The Captured Thought, The Royal Society, Uncategorized, University of Cambridge | Tagged , | Leave a comment

The Captured Thought~ Professor’s Nicky Clayton and Clive Wilkins ‘Zoom’ across the world at top speed in the absence of travel

Posted in CHINA UK DEVELOPMENT CENTRE, Clive Wilkins, Clive WILKINS AUTHOR, Department of Psychology, Nicky Clayton, Nicky Clayton Artist in residence. Rambert, Prof. Clive Wilkins, Prof. Nicky Clayton, Prof. Nicola Clayton, Professor Clive Wilkins, Professor Nicky Clayton, The Captured Thought, The Moustachio Quartet, The Royal Society, University of Cambridge | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

The Captured Thought discusses The Moustachio Quartet. A series of three talks, devised by CCISTC, for Dalian University, China. Investigating the literary process~ from textual influences to origination of ideas and final editing. Professor Nicky Clayton FRS interviews the author Clive Wilkins

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Professors Nicky Clayton & Clive Wilkins went to SciFoo 2020. :-)

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN~ Magic Is (Literally) for the Birds~ What conjuring techniques can reveal about animal cognition ~ an article by Susana Martinez-Conde and Stephen L. Macknik October 13, 2020

The magician climbs into the cage to perform a show for one. For this special event, he eschews coins and cards for peanuts. He rolls his sleeves and faces his captive audience: a corvid bird by the name of Stuka. He shows Stuka a peanut and waves it through the air, sweeping it from one hand to another. Stuka tracks the treat, moving its head like a spectator at a tennis match. Then the magician opens his right hand and shows … nothing! The nut has disappeared! Stuka seems to look around for the missing legume, but the magician pulls it from inside his mouth. Was it there all along? Now the magician vanishes the peanut again, pulling it from his ear next. The peanut keeps magically switching from one place to another, and a second bird approaches to watch, perhaps out of curiosity. The question is, what are those birdbrains thinking?

Elias Garcia-Pelegrin learned to perform magic as an undergraduate student studying drama at University College London (UCL). Upon graduating—and realizing that acting wouldn’t pay the bills—he worked as a bar magician. He also took a job as a zookeeper in an aquarium and grew fascinated with the possible role of social transmission in the mating rituals of penguins. By then, he had gone back to college for a second degree in psychology. Now a Ph.D. student at the University of Cambridge, Garcia-Pelegrin is set to apply his multifaceted background in psychology, zoology and magic to the study of animal cognition.

Garcia-Pelegrin’s approach, presented in a recent Science perspective co-authored by Alexandra Schnell, Clive Wilkins, and Nicola S. Clayton, follows in the footsteps of research deploying visual illusions to better understand perception in such disparate species as lions, horses, monkeys and bees. Their framework also extends prior explorations of the intersection of magic, psychology and neuroscience in subjects ranging from human audiences to nonhuman minds.

To read more visit https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/magic-is-literally-for-the-birds/

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Professors Nicky Clayton and Clive Wilkins of The Captured Thought have been invited to attend SciFoo 2020~ 23-25th October. Googleplex, Mountain View, California

About 250 attendees from all walks of life arrive at Googleplex in Mountain View, California, on a Friday for a weekend educational program — except there’s no program in place for them. And that’s intentional. Science Foo Camp — the “Foo” stands for “Friends of O’Reilly,” referencing publishing company O’Reilly Media, which hosts the event in collaboration with Google, Nature Publishing Group, and Digital Science — has been held annually since 2005 as part of a series of Foo Camps, including Social Science Foo Camp and the original Foo Camp that launched in 2003 as a hacker “unconference.”

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

28th October 2020. 9am – 2.00pm Mexico time. 3pm-8pm UK time. Zoom presentation at the Centro Tlaxcala de Biologia de la Conducta, Unversidad Automoma de Tlaxcala, Mexico. Behaviour Symposium. “Conflict: Current validity and relevance of the four Tinbergen questions’ The Development and Evolution of Cognitive Illusions

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment